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A Beginners Guide to Bitcoin, Blockchain & Cryptocurrency

As cryptocurrency, and blockchain technology become more abundant throughout our society, it’s important to understand the inner workings of this technology, especially if you plan to use cryptocurrency as an investment vehicle. If you’re new to the crypto-sphere, learning about Bitcoin makes it much easier to understand other cryptocurrencies as many other altcoins' technologies are borrowed directly from Bitcoin.
Bitcoin is one of those things that you look into only to discover you have more questions than answers, and right as you’re starting to wrap your head around the technology; you discover the fact that Bitcoin has six other variants (forks), the amount of politics at hand, or that there are over a thousand different cryptocurrencies just as complex if not even more complex than Bitcoin.
We are currently in the infancy of blockchain technology and the effects of this technology will be as profound as the internet. This isn’t something that’s just going to fade away into history as you may have been led to believe. I believe this is something that will become an integral part of our society, eventually embedded within our technology. If you’re a crypto-newbie, be glad that you're relatively early to the industry. I hope this post will put you on the fast-track to understanding Bitcoin, blockchain, and how a large percentage of cryptocurrencies work.

Community Terminology

Altcoin: Short for alternative coin. There are over 1,000 different cryptocurrencies. You’re probably most familiar with Bitcoin. Anything that isn’t Bitcoin is generally referred to as an altcoin.
HODL: Misspelling of hold. Dank meme accidentally started by this dude. Hodlers are much more interested in long term gains rather than playing the risky game of trying to time the market.
TO THE MOON: When a cryptocurrency’s price rapidly increases. A major price spike of over 1,000% can look like it’s blasting off to the moon. Just be sure you’re wearing your seatbelt when it comes crashing down.
FUD: Fear. Uncertainty. Doubt.
FOMO: Fear of missing out.
Bull Run: Financial term used to describe a rising market.
Bear Run: Financial term used to describe a falling market.

What Is Bitcoin?

Bitcoin (BTC) is a decentralized digital currency that uses cryptography to secure and ensure validity of transactions within the network. Hence the term crypto-currency. Decentralization is a key aspect of Bitcoin. There is no CEO of Bitcoin or central authoritative government in control of the currency. The currency is ran and operated by the people, for the people. One of the main development teams behind Bitcoin is blockstream.
Bitcoin is a product of blockchain technology. Blockchain is what allows for the security and decentralization of Bitcoin. To understand Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies, you must understand to some degree, blockchain. This can get extremely technical the further down the rabbit hole you go, and because this is technically a beginners guide, I’m going to try and simplify to the best of my ability and provide resources for further technical reading.

A Brief History

Bitcoin was created by Satoshi Nakamoto. The identity of Nakamoto is unknown. The idea of Bitcoin was first introduced in 2008 when Nakamoto released the Bitcoin white paper - Bitcoin: A Peer-to-Peer Electronic Cash System. Later, in January 2009, Nakamoto announced the Bitcoin software and the Bitcoin network officially began.
I should also mention that the smallest unit of a Bitcoin is called a Satoshi. 1 BTC = 100,000,000 Satoshis. When purchasing Bitcoin, you don’t actually need to purchase an entire coin. Bitcoin is divisible, so you can purchase any amount greater than 1 Satoshi (0.00000001 BTC).

What Is Blockchain?

Blockchain is a distributed ledger, a distributed collection of accounts. What is being accounted for depends on the use-case of the blockchain itself. In the case of Bitcoin, what is being accounted for is financial transactions.
The first block in a blockchain is referred to as the genesis block. A block is an aggregate of data. Blocks are also discovered through a process known as mining (more on this later). Each block is cryptographically signed by the previous block in the chain and visualizing this would look something akin to a chain of blocks, hence the term, blockchain.
For more information regarding blockchain I’ve provided more resouces below:

What is Bitcoin Mining

Bitcoin mining is one solution to the double spend problem. Bitcoin mining is how transactions are placed into blocks and added onto the blockchain. This is done to ensure proof of work, where computational power is staked in order to solve what is essentially a puzzle. If you solve the puzzle correctly, you are rewarded Bitcoin in the form of transaction fees, and the predetermined block reward. The Bitcoin given during a block reward is also the only way new Bitcoin can be introduced into the economy. With a halving event occurring roughly every 4 years, it is estimated that the last Bitcoin block will be mined in the year 2,140. (See What is Block Reward below for more info).
Mining is one of those aspects of Bitcoin that can get extremely technical and more complicated the further down the rabbit hole you go. An entire website could be created (and many have) dedicated solely to information regarding Bitcoin mining. The small paragraph above is meant to briefly expose you to the function of mining and the role it plays within the ecosystem. It doesn’t even scratch the surface regarding the topic.

How do you Purchase Bitcoin?

The most popular way to purchase Bitcoin through is through an online exchange where you trade fiat (your national currency) for Bitcoin.
Popular exchanges include:
  • Coinbase
  • Kraken
  • Cex
  • Gemini
There’s tons of different exchanges. Just make sure you find one that supports your national currency.

Volatility

Bitcoin and cryptocurrencies are EXTREMELY volatile. Swings of 30% or more within a few days is not unheard of. Understand that there is always inherent risks with any investment. Cryptocurrencies especially. Only invest what you’re willing to lose.

Transaction & Network Fees

Transacting on the Bitcoin network is not free. Every purchase or transfer of Bitcoin will cost X amount of BTC depending on how congested the network is. These fees are given to miners as apart of the block reward.
Late 2017 when Bitcoin got up to $20,000USD, the average network fee was ~$50. Currently, at the time of writing this, the average network fee is $1.46. This data is available in real-time on BitInfoCharts.

Security

In this new era of money, there is no central bank or government you can go to in need of assistance. This means the responsibility of your money falls 100% into your hands. That being said, the security regarding your cryptocurrency should be impeccable. The anonymity provided by cryptocurrencies alone makes you a valuable target to hackers and scammers. Below I’ve detailed out best practices regarding securing your cryptocurrency.

Two-Factor Authentication (2FA)

Two-factor authentication is a second way of authenticating your identity upon signing in to an account. Most cryptocurrency related software/websites will offer or require some form of 2FA. Upon creation of any crypto-related account find the Security section and enable 2FA.

SMS Authentication

The most basic form of 2FA which you are probably most familiar with. This form of authentication sends a text message to your smartphone with a special code that will allow access to your account upon entry. Note that this is not the safest form of 2FA as you may still be vulnerable to what is known as a SIM swap attack. SIM swapping is a social engineering method in which an attacker will call up your phone carrier, impersonating you, in attempt to re-activate your SIM card on his/her device. Once the attacker has access to your SIM card he/she now has access to your text messages which can then be used to access your online accounts. You can prevent this by using an authenticator such as Google Authenticator.

Authenticator

The use of an authenticator is the safest form of 2FA. An authenticator is installed on a seperate device and enabling it requires you input an ever changing six digit code in order to access your account. I recommend using Google Authenticator.
If a website has the option to enable an authenticator, it will give you a QR code and secret key. Use Google Authenticator to scan the QR code. The secret key consists of a random string of numbers and letters. Write this down on a seperate sheet of paper and do not store it on a digital device.
Once Google Authenticator has been enabled, every time you sign into your account, you will have to input a six-digit code that looks similar to this. If you happen to lose or damage the device you have Google Authenticator installed on, you will be locked out of your account UNLESS you have access to the secret key (which you should have written down).

Hardware Wallets

A wallet is what you store Bitcoin and cryptocurrency on. I’ll provide resources on the different type of wallets later but I want to emphasize the use of a hardware wallet (aka cold storage).
Hardware wallets are the safest way of storing cryptocurrency because it allows for your crypto to be kept offline in a physical device. After purchasing crypto via an exchange, I recommend transferring it to cold storage. The most popular hardware wallets include the Ledger Nano S, and Trezor.
Hardware wallets come with a special key so that if it gets lost or damaged, you can recover your crypto. I recommend keeping your recovery key as well as any other sensitive information in a safety deposit box.
I know this all may seem a bit manic, but it is important you take the necessary security precautions in order to ensure the safety & longevity of your cryptocurrency.

Technical Aspects of Bitcoin

TL;DR
  • Address: What you send Bitcoin to.
  • Wallet: Where you store your Bitcoin
  • Max Supply: 21 million
  • Block Time: ~10 minutes
  • Block Size: 1-2 MB
  • Block Reward: BTC reward received from mining.

What is a Bitcoin Address?

A Bitcoin address is what you send Bitcoin to. If you want to receive Bitcoin you’d give someone your Bitcoin address. Think of a Bitcoin address as an email address for money.

What is a Bitcoin Wallet?

As the title implies, a Bitcoin wallet is anything that can store Bitcoin. There are many different types of wallets including paper wallets, software wallets and hardware wallets. It is generally advised NOT to keep cryptocurrency on an exchange, as exchanges are prone to hacks (see Mt. Gox hack).
My preferred method of storing cryptocurrency is using a hardware wallet such as the Ledger Nano S or Trezor. These allow you to keep your crypto offline in physical form and as a result, much more safe from hacks. Paper wallets also allow for this but have less functionality in my opinion.
After I make crypto purchases, I transfer it to my Ledger Nano S and keep that in a safe at home. Hardware wallets also come with a special key so that if it gets lost or damaged, you can recover your crypto. I recommend keeping your recovery key in a safety deposit box.

What is Bitcoins Max Supply?

The max supply of Bitcoin is 21 million. The only way new Bitcoins can be introduced into the economy are through block rewards which are given after successfully mining a block (more on this later).

What is Bitcoins Block Time?

The average time in which blocks are created is called block time. For Bitcoin, the block time is ~10 minutes, meaning, 10 minutes is the minimum amount of time it will take for a Bitcoin transaction to be processed. Note that transactions on the Bitcoin network can take much longer depending on how congested the network is. Having to wait a few hours or even a few days in some instances for a transaction to clear is not unheard of.
Other cryptocurrencies will have different block times. For example, Ethereum has a block time of ~15 seconds.
For more information on how block time works, Prabath Siriwardena has a good block post on this subject which can be found here.

What is Bitcoins Block Size?

There is a limit to how large blocks can be. In the early days of Bitcoin, the block size was 36MB, but in 2010 this was reduced to 1 MB in order to prevent distributed denial of service attacks (DDoS), spam, and other malicious use on the blockchain. Nowadays, blocks are routinely in excess of 1MB, with the largest to date being somewhere around 2.1 MB.
There is much debate amongst the community on whether or not to increase Bitcoin’s block size limit to account for ever-increasing network demand. A larger block size would allow for more transactions to be processed. The con argument to this is that decentralization would be at risk as mining would become more centralized. As a result of this debate, on August 1, 2017, Bitcoin underwent a hard-fork and Bitcoin Cash was created which has a block size limit of 8 MB. Note that these are two completely different blockchains and sending Bitcoin to a Bitcoin Cash wallet (or vice versa) will result in a failed transaction.
Update: As of May 15th, 2018 Bitcoin Cash underwent another hard fork and the block size has increased to 32 MB.
On the topic of Bitcoin vs Bitcoin Cash and which cryptocurrency is better, I’ll let you do your own research and make that decision for yourself. It is good to know that this is a debated topic within the community and example of the politics that manifest within the space. Now if you see community members arguing about this topic, you’ll at least have a bit of background to the issue.

What is Block Reward?

Block reward is the BTC you receive after discovering a block. Blocks are discovered through a process called mining. The only way new BTC can be added to the economy is through block rewards and the block reward is halved every 210,000 blocks (approximately every 4 years). Halving events are done to limit the supply of Bitcoin. At the inception of Bitcoin, the block reward was 50BTC. At the time of writing this, the block reward is 12.5BTC. Halving events will continue to occur until the amount of new Bitcoin introduced into the economy becomes less than 1 Satoshi. This is expected to happen around the year 2,140. All 21 million Bitcoins will have been mined. Once all Bitcoins have been mined, the block reward will only consist of transaction fees.

Technical Aspects Continued

Understanding Nodes

Straight from the Bitcoin.it wiki
Any computer that connects to the Bitcoin network is called a node. Nodes that fully verify all of the rules of Bitcoin are called full nodes.
In other words, full nodes are what verify the Bitcoin blockchain and they play a crucial role in maintaining the decentralized network. Full nodes store the entirety of the blockchain and validate transactions. Anyone can participate in the Bitcoin network and run a full node. Bitcoin.org has information on how to set up a full node. Running a full node also gives you wallet capabilities and the ability to query the blockchain.
For more information on Bitcoin nodes, see Andreas Antonopoulos’s Q&A on the role of nodes.

What is a Fork?

A fork is a divergence in a blockchain. Since Bitcoin is a peer-to-peer network, there’s an overall set of rules (protocol) in which participants within the network must abide by. These rules are put in place to form network consensus. Forks occur when implementations must be made to the blockchain or if there is disagreement amongst the network on how consensus should be achieved.

Soft Fork vs Hard Fork

The difference between soft and hard forks lies in compatibility. Soft forks are backwards compatible, hard forks are not. Think of soft forks as software upgrades to the blockchain, whereas hard forks are a software upgrade that warrant a completely new blockchain.
During a soft fork, miners and nodes upgrade their software to support new consensus rules. Nodes that do not upgrade will still accept the new blockchain.
Examples of Bitcoin soft forks include:
A hard fork can be thought of as the creation of a new blockchain that X percentage of the community decides to migrate too. During a hard fork, miners and nodes upgrade their software to support new consensus rules, Nodes that do not upgrade are invalid and cannot accept the new blockchain.
Examples of Bitcoin hard forks include:
  • Bitcoin Cash
  • Bitcoin Gold
Note that these are completely different blockchains and independent from the Bitcoin blockchain. If you try to send Bitcoin to one of these blockchains, the transaction will fail.

A Case For Bitcoin in a World of Centralization

Our current financial system is centralized, which means the ledger(s) that operate within this centralized system are subjugated to control, manipulation, fraud, and many other negative aspects that come with this system. There are also pros that come with a centralized system, such as the ability to swiftly make decisions. However, at some point, the cons outweigh the pros, and change is needed. What makes Bitcoin so special as opposed to our current financial system is that Bitcoin allows for the decentralized transfer of money. Not one person owns the Bitcoin network, everybody does. Not one person controls Bitcoin, everybody does. A decentralized system in theory removes much of the baggage that comes with a centralized system. Not to say the Bitcoin network doesn’t have its problems (wink wink it does), and there’s much debate amongst the community as to how to go about solving these issues. But even tiny steps are significant steps in the world of blockchain, and I believe Bitcoin will ultimately help to democratize our financial system, whether or not you believe it is here to stay for good.

Final Conclusions

Well that was a lot of words… Anyways I hope this guide was beneficial, especially to you crypto newbies out there. You may have come into this realm not expecting there to be an abundance of information to learn about. I know I didn’t. Bitcoin is only the tip of the iceberg, but now that you have a fundamental understanding of Bitcoin, learning about other cryptocurrencies such as Litecoin, and Ethereum will come more naturally.
Feel free to ask questions below! I’m sure either the community or myself would be happy to answer your questions.
Thanks for reading!

Related Links

Guides

Exchanges

submitted by MrCryptoDude to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

A cryptoforker's guide to free money - Part 1 (The holy ymgve script + what and where to exchange)

EDIT: a new version of this guide, multilingual and featuring a wallet checker (input your IP, see what you can fork and how much it is worth) is available at https://cryptodom.org

Hello my lovely forkers!
A while ago I made a post A cryptoforker's guide to free money - Part 2 (Coinomi, Bither, Bitpie, Walleting Services) where I explained how I used a combination of COINOMI and BITPIE (together with DIG WALLETING SERVICES) to get hold of most forked coins - And then how I sold them (main sites used: GATE.IO / BTCTRADE.COM / BIT-Z.COM / EXRATES.ME / COINEX.COM). Please refer to that for the instructions regarding Bither and Coinomi.
QUICK NOTE: If you are a seasoned forker, just look at point 4 and see if your pokem… I mean fork coins collection is complete :-p / If instead you are a total newbie, remember you can just do the “PREPARATION” part and then claim through DIG WALLETING (affiliate link: https://dig.walleting.services/#/aff/o5YP75ALDORdaAbmrJJx NON affiliate link: https://dig.walleting.services/# ) if the process is too hard/long/risky - these guys are reliable and provide a great service, especially for those who have a plethora of transactions and would need to hunt down every last key manually - they have a Reddit, too: you can reach them at Walleting_Services .
BEFORE YOU START: What is a fork? Is it really free money? Imagine you had a bank account at BTCbank and a card for it. Tomorrow BTCbank splits and half of its branches become BTC2bank. Nothing changes for you as a client of BTCbank, however there is something you can now do. You can move your money from your BTCbank account to a new BTCbank account, in practice making the card for your former account useless in the BTNbank branches but… NOT IN THE BTN2bank branches! So you can go there and get the equivalent of what you had in “free” money. Nothing illegal, nothing shady, no bugs or exploits: it’s all there by design. Keeping with the example though, it should be specified that you must have the “card” of your BTCbank, which in this case is a private key. If you have your BTC stored on papehardware wallet or anywhere else where you are in direct control of your private keys, well done! Those keys are your BTCbank card(s). If, on the other hand, you held your money on an exchange (Binance, Bitfinex, Bittrex, you name it), then your only chance is to wait and hope that the exchange decides to support the coin and gives you your share. It’s not impossible but it introduces a middleman. It’s like you are asking your uncle to have an account in his name at BTCbank and there is no guarantee that uncle will go to a new branch of BTNbank2 and use the card trick to get the free money and give it to you, no matter how much you ask him to. He could do it, he could not: it’s uncle’s call.
PREPARATION: First of all, a question: are you after the fork money to exchange it yourself or do you just want to claim it but want someone else to do all the exchange part for you? If you want to squeeze every last bit out of it, get ready to sign up to a few Chinese exchanges! You might as well do this now before you start, otherwise you’ll get stuck at the cashing part. Same goes for the script. No target address, no script. I warned you :) Anyway, here’s the list: • GATE.IOBTCTRADE.IMCOINEX.COMEXRATES.METRADESATOSHI.COMBIT-Z.COM
My personal favourite is GATE.IO, despite the 60 confirmations (up to 14 hours), but they all helped me one way or another, and most importantly they all allow withdrawal (BTCTRADE.IM wanted verification papers, the others didn’t). Also, make sure to have Coinomi, Bither and Bitpie installed on an Android phone.
STEP 1 - THE GOLDEN RULE Just like in the previous post, let me start off by warning everyone: what are you about to do is dangerous. You could lose your bitcoins. Are you scared? You should be, cause the threat is real. Nobody wants to lose 1 BTC to try and claim a few tens/hundreds of dollars, right? So, first and foremost, make sure that you MOVE your coins from wherever they are (ideally, an offline wallet like a ledger or a trezor), and then, once the wallet is empty, feel free to play around with its private keys, that will hopefully show some transferrable balance at the time of the fork.
STEP 2 - GETTING YOUR KEYS - https://iancoleman.io/bip39/
For getting the keys, this is your number one option - with an offline version for paranoid available, no less. Use the seed (those 24 words in the case of ledger, for example) and after the calculation go get your keys in the chart at the end of the page. In case you have segwit addresses or special scenarios (like a wallet with a lot of operations over a long time), getting the keys, or the “right” keys, might take a while. Anyway: let’s look at the first line of the chart. In the first column you will find the address: copy and paste it onto https://blockchain.info/ and press enter to get the transaction history for that given address. Let’s suppose for the sake of this example that our address shows 2 transactions: one inbound for 2 BTC 1 year ago and anther one for the outgoing BTC 5 minutes ago (because before we started this we DID move them out, right?!?). What that means is that at the time of the forkS (in this case we’d get money from most of them) we had 2 BTC on that address. Great, so it’s loaded, and we need its key. Let’s go back to the chart on line one and let’s have a look at the third column: this is our private key. We will use it later to sweep or import in the various method outlined.
STEP 3 - THE SCRIPT - https://github.com/ymgve/bitcoin_fork_claimer
If you have ben around this subreddit long enough you surely read about the script… And spared a tender thought for ymgve who made this possible. Yet, no one really explains properly how to use it. Unfortunately I do not have the time to explain how to get python installed and running on a machine, you will have to figure it out on your own. Same goes for the fact that you might need to write “py” or “python” before the actual “claimer.py (…)” command. Let’s say you somehow get ready to run the script - now you do have a series of examples on the github page, but they are not so easy to understand for the uninitiated. Here is the relevant quote:
In blockchain.info mode it uses the blockchain.info API to query and validate information about the transaction you're spending from. This only works for transferring/claiming coins that existed on the BTC main chain pre-fork. SYNTAX: * claimer.py * EXAMPLE CLAIMING BTG - BITCOIN GOLD: * claimer.py BTG 4adc4(...) 5K2Y(...) 1HKqKTM(...) 1aa5cm(...)*
Let’s have a look at the example and remember what we did before in the “preparation” and “getting your keys” sections. In the former, we signed up at the exchanges so we now have the relevant deposit addresses, right? So let’s say we want to get fork XXX : let’s look for a deposit address of XXX and let’s call it DEPOXXX - Next, (hello, blockchain.info – here’s my wallet address from column one) we’ll look for the transaction ID (TRANSXXX) of the wallet (WALLETXXX) we have the private key of (PRIVATEXXX). We have it all now, so our script will be:
claimer.py XXX TRANSXXX PRIVATEXXX WALLETXXX DEPOXXX
Admittedly, there is a more complicated method for FBTC and also some kind of manual mode to transfer just parts of the sum and set the transaction fees, if you need those, good luck :)
Also, I was contacted by ottoteixeira who reminded me he created a very useful script (I actually used it during my first attempts) - What it does is to create the scripts to run on ymgve's script. A script for the script, right - sounds complicated but it actually makes your life easier once you understood what you are doing. Give it a try: Otto's script - (requires minimal coding skills to edit the file with your own data)
STEP 4 - WHICH EXCHANGE FOR WHAT? SCRIPT/APP CLAIM:
BCH/BTG - Claim with Coinomi, move to Binance
SBTC/BCD - Claim with Coinomi, move to gate.io
CLAM/BTX- Claim with Coinomi, move to bit-z.com
BTP/BTN/BTW/BTF - Claim with Bither and exchange with Bitpie (move them to the bitpie bank once they cleared to be able to trade on the exchange)
B2X - Claim with script straight to exrates.me
BPA- Claim with Bither, no exchange accepting deposits so far
BTW - Claim with Bither, move to btctrade.com
BPA - Claim with Coinomi, no exchange accepting deposits so far
UBTC - Claim with script, send straight to btctrade.com
CDY - Fork of BCH, untested but should work with script straight to bitpie
BTV - Claim with script straight to coinex.com or bit-z.com
OTHERS:
LBTC - Claim with the online wallet (http://lightningbitcoin.io/ ) (download, run, sweep keys) - can be traded through cryptosnake
LCH - Claim with online wallet (https://litecoinca.sh/#download ) (download, run, sweep keys) - can be traded on tradesatoshi.com
BTCP – I haven’t claimed it yet but some people seem to have made it. To keep up with the news, I follow the #bitcoinadrops discord channel, they talk about it and they are hilarious ☺
UPDATE: Can be claimed with Coinomi (only non segwit though, so I can't test at teh moment). Many successful reports of claiming already. First price I've seen was 0.002 - seems low compared to the hype. I was hoping for 0.02 :-p
NO LUCK HERE:
BCK/BTSQ/BTT/WBTC - Claimable through the script apparently, I haven’t tested cause I have no target address
BTH/BCX - I am yet to find an address where to send them to :(
STEP 5 - FINAL NOTE: Oh no! After 2 days of python, apps, furious coin creation and shady Chinese exchanges you are done. Bonanza is over. Not quite! Here is a little reminder of where to find the info you want and need about the forks -
• cryptodom.org - start from here, always
BitcoinAirdropsTrades - end up here if you are the kind of person who wants to pre trade forks the moment the wallet hits Github :)
And that is all, folks :) Feel free to ask me questions if you are stuck or something is not clear, and I will try my best to answer you. If I helped you, feel free to tip your humble fellow forker here—>
•BTC tip jar: 1BEAADXCk3ng2ZRsinHmwVyZQf1Vu9AcDj
•LTC tip jar: LYT1sbotLuUtU5v5r9uEu61xoGpJ1s4aau
Oh and one last thing… I did help 4 people to sell some of their forked coins, two of them from Reddit. They are binsone and whospumpin. A lot of people are helping, I know… camku Playboy_BTC cryptosnake eliteluxurytrades - Personally I used cryptosnake twice and he was fair and square with me: honestly, all these guys can do some coins I do not handle (LBTC / LCH and even BTCP) - but hey, I am still your favourite one cause I showed you how to do it yourselves, no? So if you are being lazy, let me work for you and let’s share your profits at the usual rate of 5% (over 2k) / 10% (less than 2k) commission :-)
submitted by crytposhadow to BitcoinAirdrops [link] [comments]

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How to get set up on Bitcoin Exchange in Meta Trader 4 ...

Find out how to set up the software Meta Trader 4 to trade cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin and Litecoin on the btc-e exchange. Depth Chart Binance Explained for Crypto Trading. How to Read Binance Depth Chart for beginners. GET YOUR FREE STOCK in Robinhood http://share.robinhood.com/... Bitcoin Kurs steigt 100% Beste Coins des Jahres BTC Whales & Scams Halving Banken Binance 🛳 CryptoRockstars Tickets (Code - 10%: CRYPTOMONDAY): htt... This video is unavailable. Watch Queue Queue. Watch Queue Queue Queue I DO NOT PARTICIPATE IN PAID REVIEWS OR PROMOTIONS. IF YOU HAVE BEEN APPROACHED BY SOMEONE ON TELEGRAM CLAIMING TO BE A PART OF THE CRYPTO TIPS TEAM, THEY ARE SCAMMERS! LTC Chart by request 1:03:46 XLM Chart by request 1:05:57 XMR Chart by request 1:07:16 SGOL is a 2 year buy and hold, Time will tell 1:08:02 Matic Chart by request 1:09:58 ZEC Chart by request 1:17:20 Welcome back to Coin Rivet TV! In this video, Oliver and Nawaz take a look at the Binance Coin chart. Thanks for watching, we will see you again next time! Bitcoin Ethereum Litecoin Ripple Binance Technical Analysis chart ... Get trading support and on-demand technical analysis for your requested tickers. Sign up today at: https://www.chartguys.com ... Bitcoin Ethereum Litecoin Ripple Binance Technical Analysis Chart 9/6/2019 by ChartGuys.com ... Live Bitcoin Price Chart and Live Bitcoin Trading with Crypto Robot DeriBot. Vera Trading 307 ... Bitcoin Technical Analysis & Bitcoin News Today: Binance launches their FIAT to crypto exchange Binance Jersey, and I'll show you that the coming financial crisis might happen sooner rather than ...

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